Drug: Boniva

BONIVA (ibandronate sodium) is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that inhibits osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. The chemical name for ibandronate sodium is 3-(N-methyl-N-pentyl) amino-1-hydroxypropane-1,1diphosphonic acid, monosodium salt, monohydrate with the molecular formula C9H22NO7P2Na•H2O and a molecular weight of 359.24. Ibandronate sodium is a white-to off-white powder. It is freely soluble in water and practically insoluble in organic solvents. Ibandronate sodium has the following structural formula: BONIVA is available as a white, oblong, 150 mg film-coated tablet for once-monthly oral administration. One 150 mg film-coated tablet contains 168.75 mg ibandronate monosodium monohydrate, equivalent to 150 mg free acid. BONIVA also contains the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate, povidone, microcrystalline cellulose, crospovidone, purified stearic acid, colloidal silicon dioxide, and purified water. The tablet film coating contains hypromellose, titanium dioxide, talc, polyethylene glycol 6000, and purified water.

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Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Treatment and Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Daily Dosing The safety of BONIVA 2.5 mg once daily in the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis was assessed in 3577 patients aged 41 – 82 years. The duration of the trials was 2 to 3 years, with 1134 patients exposed to placebo and 1140 exposed to BONIVA 2.5 mg. Patients with pre-existing gastrointestinal disease and concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors and H2 antagonists were included in these clinical trials. All patients received 500 mg calcium plus 400 international units vitamin D supplementation daily. The incidence of all-cause mortality was 1% in the placebo group and 1.2% in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group. The incidence of serious adverse reactions was 20% in the placebo group and 23% in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group. The percentage of patients who withdrew from treatment due to adverse reactions was approximately 17% in both the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group and the placebo group. Table 1 lists adverse reactions from the treatment and prevention studies reported in greater than or equal to 2% of patients and more frequently in patients treated daily with BONIVA than patients treated with placebo. Table 1 : Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence Greater Than or Equal to 2% and in More Patients Treated with BONIVA Than in Patients Treated with Placebo Daily in the Osteoporosis Treatment and Prevention Studies
Body System Placebo %
(n=1134) BONIVA 2.5 mg %
(n=1140) Body as a Whole   Back Pain 12 14   Pain in Extremity 6 8   Asthenia 2 4   Allergic Reaction 2 3 Digestive System   Dyspepsia 10 12   Diarrhea 5 7   Tooth Disorder 2 4   Vomiting 2 3   Gastritis 2 2 Musculoskeletal System   Myalgia 5 6   Joint Disorder 3 4   Arthritis 3 3 Nervous System   Headache 6 7   Dizziness 3 4   Vertigo 3 3 Respiratory System   Upper Respiratory Infection 33 34   Bronchitis 7 10   Pneumonia 4 6   Pharyngitis 2 3 Urogenital System   Urinary Tract Infection 4 6 Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions The incidence of selected gastrointestinal adverse reactions in the placebo and BONIVA 2.5 mg daily groups were: dyspepsia (10% vs. 12%), diarrhea (5% vs. 7%), and abdominal pain (5% vs. 6%). Musculoskeletal Adverse Reactions The incidence of selected musculoskeletal adverse reactions in the placebo and BONIVA 2.5 mg daily groups were: back pain (12% vs. 14%), arthralgia (14% vs. 14%) and myalgia (5% vs. 6%). Ocular Adverse Events Reports in the medical literature indicate that bisphosphonates may be associated with ocular inflammation such as iritis and scleritis. In some cases, these events did not resolve until the bisphosphonate was discontinued. There were no reports of ocular inflammation in studies with BONIVA 2.5 mg daily. Monthly Dosing The safety of BONIVA 150 mg once monthly in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis was assessed in a two year trial which enrolled 1583 patients aged 54 – 81 years, with 395 patients exposed to BONIVA 2.5 mg daily and 396 exposed to BONIVA 150 mg monthly. Patients with active or significant pre-existing gastrointestinal disease were excluded from this trial. Patients with dyspepsia or concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors and H2 antagonists were included in this study. All patients received 500 mg calcium plus 400 international units vitamin D supplementation daily. After one year, the incidence of all-cause mortality was 0.3% in both the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group and the BONIVA 150 mg monthly group. The incidence of serious adverse events was 5% in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group and 7% in the BONIVA 150 mg monthly group. The percentage of patients who withdrew from treatment due to adverse events was 9% in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group and 8% in the BONIVA 150 mg monthly group. Table 2 lists the adverse events reported in greater than or equal to 2% of patients. Table 2 : Adverse Events with an Incidence of at Least 2% in Patients Treated with BONIVA 2.5 mg Daily or 150 mg Once-Monthly for Treatment of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
Body System/Adverse Event BONIVA 2.5 mg Daily %
(n=395) BONIVA 150 mg Monthly %
(n=396) Vascular Disorders   Hypertension 7.3 6.3 Gastrointestinal Disorders   Dyspepsia 7.1 5.6   Nausea 4.8 5.1   Diarrhea 4.1 5.1   Constipation 2.5 4.0   Abdominal Paina 5.3 7.8 Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders   Arthralgia 3.5 5.6   Back Pain 4.3 4.5   Pain in Extremity 1.3 4.0   Localized Osteoarthritis 1.3 3.0   Myalgia 0.8 2.0   Muscle Cramp 2.0 1.8 Infections and Infestations   Influenza 3.8 4.0   Nasopharyngitis 4.3 3.5   Bronchitis 3.5 2.5   Urinary Tract Infection 1.8 2.3   Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 2.0 2.0 Nervous System Disorders   Headache 4.1 3.3   Dizziness 1.0 2.3 General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions   Influenza-like Illnessb 0.8 3.3 Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders   Rashc 1.3 2.3 Psychiatric Disorders   Insomnia 0.8 2.0 aCombination of abdominal pain and abdominal pain upper
bCombination of influenza-like illness and acute phase reaction
cCombination of rash pruritic, rash macular, rash papular, rash generalized, rash erythematous, dermatitis, dermatitis allergic, dermatitis medicamentosa, erythema and exanthema Gastrointestinal Adverse Events The incidence of adverse events in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily and BONIVA 150 mg monthly groups were: dyspepsia (7% vs. 6%), diarrhea (4% vs. 5%), and abdominal pain (5% vs. 8%). Musculoskeletal Adverse Events The incidence of adverse events in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily and BONIVA 150 mg monthly groups were: back pain (4% vs. 5%), arthralgia (4% vs. 6%) and myalgia (1% vs. 2%). Acute Phase Reactions Symptoms consistent with acute phase reactions have been reported with bisphosphonate use. Over the two years of the study, the overall incidence of acute phase reaction symptoms was 3% in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group and 9% in the BONIVA 150 mg monthly group. These incidence rates are based on the reporting of any of 33 acute-phase reaction like symptoms within 3 days of the monthly dosing and lasting 7 days or less. Influenza like illness was reported in no patients in the BONIVA 2.5 mg daily group and 2% in the BONIVA 150 mg monthly group. Ocular Adverse Events Two patients who received BONIVA 150 mg once-monthly experienced ocular inflammation, one was a case of uveitis and the other scleritis. One hundred sixty (160) postmenopausal women without osteoporosis participated in a 1-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of BONIVA 150 mg once-monthly for prevention of bone loss. Seventy-seven subjects received BONIVA and 83 subjects received placebo. The overall pattern of adverse events was similar to that previously observed. Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of BONIVA. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Hypersensitivity Allergic reactions including anaphylactic reaction/shock; in some cases fatal, angioedema, bronchospasm, asthma exacerbations, and rash have been reported (see CONTRAINDICATIONS). Hypocalcemia Hypocalcemia has been reported in patients treated with BONIVA (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS). Musculoskeletal Pain Bone, joint, or muscle pain (musculoskeletal pain), described as severe or incapacitating, has been reported (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS). Jaw Osteonecrosis Osteonecrosis of the jaw has been reported in patients treated with BONIVA (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS). Atypical Femoral Shaft Fracture Atypical, low-energy, or low-trauma fractures of the femoral shaft (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS). Read the Boniva (ibandronate sodium) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effectsLearn More »

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Dosage Information The dose of BONIVA is one 150 mg tablet taken once monthly on the same date each month. Important Administration Instructions Instruct Patients to do the following:
  • Take BONIVA at least 60 minutes before the first food or drink (other than water) of the day or before taking any oral medication or supplementation, including calcium, antacids, or vitamins to maximize absorption and clinical benefit, (see DRUG INTERACTIONS). Avoid the use of water with supplements including mineral water because they may have a higher concentration of calcium.
  • Swallow BONIVA tablets whole with a full glass of plain water (6 to 8 oz) while standing or sitting in an upright position to reduce the potential for esophageal irritation. Avoid lying down for 60 minutes after taking BONIVA (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS). Do not chew or suck the tablet because of a potential for oropharyngeal ulceration.
  • Do not eat, drink anything except plain water, or take other medications for at least 60 minutes after taking BONIVA.
Recommendations For Calcium And Vitamin D Supplementation Instruct patients to take supplemental calcium and vitamin D if their dietary intake is inadequate. Avoid the use of calcium supplements within 60 minutes of BONVIA administration because co-administration of BONIVA and calcium may interfere with the absorption of ibandronate sodium (see DRUG INTERACTIONS). Administration Instructions For Missed Once-Monthly Doses If the once-monthly dose is missed, instruct patients to do the following:
  • If the next scheduled BONIVA day is more than 7 days away, take one BONIVA 150 mg tablet in the morning following the date that it is remembered.
  • If the next scheduled BONIVA day is only 1 to 7 days away, wait until the subsequent month's scheduled BONIVA day to take their tablet.
For subsequent monthly doses for both of the above scenarios, instruct patients to return to their original schedule by taking one BONIVA 150 mg tablet every month on their previous chosen day.

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Calcium Supplements/Antacids Products containing calcium and other multivalent cations (such as aluminum, magnesium, iron) are likely to interfere with absorption of BONIVA. Therefore, instruct patients to take BONIVA at least 60 minutes before any oral medications, including medications containing multivalent cations (such as antacids, supplements or vitamins). Also, patients should wait at least 60 minutes after dosing before taking any other oral medications (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). Aspirin/Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Because aspirin, NSAIDs, and bisphosphonates are all associated with gastrointestinal irritation, caution should be exercised in the concomitant use of aspirin or NSAIDs with BONIVA. H2 Blockers In healthy volunteers, co-administration with ranitidine resulted in a 20% increased bioavailability of ibandronate, which was not considered to be clinically relevant (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY). Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions Bisphosphonates are known to interfere with the use of bone-imaging agents. Specific studies with ibandronate have not been performed. Last reviewed on RxList: 1/5/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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Treatment And Prevention Of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis BONIVA is indicated for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. BONIVA increases bone mineral density (BMD) and reduces the incidence of vertebral fractures. Important Limitations Of Use The optimal duration of use has not been determined. The safety and effectiveness of BONIVA for the treatment of osteoporosis are based on clinical data of three years duration. All patients on bisphosphonate therapy should have the need for continued therapy re-evaluated on a periodic basis. Patients at low-risk for fracture should be considered for drug discontinuation after 3 to 5 years of use. Patients who discontinue therapy should have their risk for fracture re-evaluated periodically.

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BONIVA is contraindicated in patients with the following conditions:
  • Abnormalities of the esophagus which delay esophageal emptying such as stricture or achalasia (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS)
  • Inability to stand or sit upright for at least 60 minutes (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION, and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS)
  • Hypocalcemia (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS)
  • Known hypersensitivity to BONIVA or to any of its excipients. Cases of anaphylaxis have been reported. (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Last reviewed on RxList: 1/5/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

No specific information is available on the treatment of overdosage of BONIVA. However, based on knowledge of this class of compounds, oral overdosage may result in hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and upper gastrointestinal adverse events, such as upset stomach, dyspepsia, esophagitis, gastritis, or ulcer. Milk or antacids should be given to bind BONIVA. Due to the risk of esophageal irritation, vomiting should not be induced, and the patient should remain fully upright. Dialysis would not be beneficial.

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Dosage Forms And Strengths BONIVA 150 mg tablets: white, oblong, engraved with “BNVA” on one side and “150” on the other side. BONIVA 150 mg tablets: supplied as white, oblong, film-coated tablets, engraved with “BNVA” on one side and “150” on the other side. Three-month supply packaged in a box with 1 blister pack containing 3 tablets (NDC 0004-0186-83). Storage And Handling Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted between 15° and 30°C (59° and 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Distributed by: Genentech USA, Inc., A Member of the Roche Group, 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080-4990. Revised: December 2014 Last reviewed on RxList: 1/5/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Source: http://www.rxlist.com

Upper Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions BONIVA, like other bisphosphonates administered orally, may cause local irritation of the upper gastrointestinal mucosa. Because of these possible irritant effects and a potential for worsening of the underlying disease, caution should be used when BONIVA is given to patients with active upper gastrointestinal problems (such as known Barrett's esophagus, dysphagia, other esophageal diseases, gastritis, duodenitis or ulcers). Esophageal adverse experiences, such as esophagitis, esophageal ulcers and esophageal erosions, occasionally with bleeding and rarely followed by esophageal stricture or perforation, have been reported in patients receiving treatment with oral bisphosphonates. In some cases, these have been severe and required hospitalization. Physicians should therefore be alert to any signs or symptoms signaling a possible esophageal reaction and patients should be instructed to discontinue BONIVA and seek medical attention if they develop dysphagia, odynophagia, retrosternal pain or new or worsening heartburn. The risk of severe esophageal adverse experiences appears to be greater in patients who lie down after taking oral bisphosphonates and/or who fail to swallow it with the recommended full glass (6-8 oz) of water, and/or who continue to take oral bisphosphonates after developing symptoms suggestive of esophageal irritation. Therefore, it is very important that the full dosing instructions are provided to, and understood by, the patient (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). In patients who cannot comply with dosing instructions due to mental disability, therapy with BONIVA should be used under appropriate supervision. There have been post-marketing reports of gastric and duodenal ulcers with oral bisphosphonate use, some severe and with complications, although no increased risk was observed in controlled clinical trials. Hypocalcemia And Mineral Metabolism Hypocalcemia has been reported in patients taking BONIVA. Treat hypocalcemia and other disturbances of bone and mineral metabolism before starting BONIVA therapy. Instruct patients to take supplemental calcium and vitamin D if their dietary intake is inadequate. (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). Musculoskeletal Pain Severe and occasionally incapacitating bone, joint, and/or muscle pain has been reported in patients taking BONIVA and other bisphosphonates (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). The time to onset of symptoms varied from one day to several months after starting the drug. Most patients had relief of symptoms after stopping. A subset had recurrence of symptoms when rechallenged with the same drug or another bisphosphonate. Consider discontinuing use if severe symptoms develop. Jaw Osteonecrosis Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), which can occur spontaneously, is generally associated with tooth extraction and/or local infection with delayed healing, and has been reported in patients taking bisphosphonates, including BONIVA. Known risk factors for osteonecrosis of the jaw include invasive dental procedures (e.g., tooth extraction, dental implants, boney surgery), diagnosis of cancer, concomitant therapies (e.g., chemotherapy, corticosteroids), poor oral hygiene, and co-morbid disorders (e.g., periodontal and/or other pre-existing dental disease, anemia, coagulopathy, infection, ill-fitting dentures). The risk of ONJ may increase with duration of exposure to bisphosphonates. For patients requiring invasive dental procedures, discontinuation of bisphosphonate treatment may reduce the risk for ONJ. Clinical judgment of the treating physician and/or oral surgeon should guide the management plan of each patient based on individual benefit/risk assessment. Patients who develop osteonecrosis of the jaw while on bisphosphonate therapy should receive care by an oral surgeon. In these patients, extensive dental surgery to treat ONJ may exacerbate the condition. Discontinuation of bisphosphonate therapy should be considered based on individual benefit/risk assessment. Atypical Subtrochanteric And Diaphyseal Femoral Fractures Atypical, low-energy, or low-trauma fractures of the femoral shaft have been reported in bisphosphonate-treated patients. These fractures can occur anywhere in the femoral shaft from just below the lesser trochanter to above the supracondylar flare and are transverse or short oblique in orientation without evidence of comminution. Causality has not been established as these fractures also occur in osteoporotic patients who have not been treated with bisphosphonates. Atypical femur fractures most commonly occur with minimal or no trauma to the affected area. They may be bilateral and many patients report prodromal pain in the affected area, usually presenting as dull, aching thigh pain, weeks to months before a complete fracture occurs. A number of reports note that patients were also receiving treatment with glucocorticoids (e.g., prednisone) at the time of fracture. Any patient with a history of bisphosphonate exposure who presents with thigh or groin pain should be suspected of having an atypical fracture and should be evaluated to rule out an incomplete femur fracture. Patients presenting with an atypical fracture should also be assessed for symptoms and signs of fracture in the contralateral limb. Interruption of bisphosphonate therapy should be considered, pending a risk/benefit assessment, on an individual basis. Severe Renal Impairment BONIVA is not recommended for use in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min). Patient Counseling Information “See FDA-approved patient labeling (Medication Guide)” Information For Patients Instruct patients to read the Medication Guide carefully before taking BONIVA and to re-read it each time the prescription is renewed because it contains important information the patient should know about BONIVA. The Medication Guide also includes the dosing instructions in order to maximize absorption and clinical benefit.
  • BONIVA should be taken at least 60 minutes before the first food or drink (other than water) of the day and before taking any oral medication or supplementation including calcium, antacids or vitamins (see DRUG INTERACTIONS).
  • To facilitate delivery to the stomach, and thus reduce the potential for esophageal irritation, BONIVA tablets should be swallowed whole with a full glass of plain water (6 to 8 oz) while the patient is standing or sitting in an upright position. Patients should not lie down for 60 minutes after taking BONIVA.
  • Patients should not eat, drink anything except for water, or take other medications for 60 minutes after taking BONIVA.
  • Plain water is the only drink that should be taken with BONIVA. Note that some mineral waters may have a higher concentration of calcium and therefore should not be used.
  • Patients should not chew or suck the tablet because of a potential for oropharyngeal ulceration.
  • The BONIVA 150 mg tablet should be taken on the same date each month (i.e., the patient's BONIVA day).
  • The patient must not take two 150 mg tablets within the same week.
  • If the once-monthly dose is missed, and the patient's next scheduled BONIVA day is more than 7 days away, the patient should be instructed to take one BONIVA 150 mg tablet in the morning following the date that it is remembered (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). The patient should then return to taking one BONIVA 150 mg tablet every month in the morning of their chosen day, according to their original schedule.
  • If the once-monthly dose is missed, and the patient's next scheduled BONIVA day is only 1 to 7 days away, the patient must wait until the subsequent month's scheduled BONIVA day to take their tablet. The patient should then return to taking one BONIVA 150 mg tablet every month in the morning of their chosen day, according to their original schedule.
Patients should receive supplemental calcium and vitamin D if dietary intake is inadequate. Intake of supplemental calcium and vitamin D should be delayed for at least 60 minutes following oral administration of BONIVA in order to maximize absorption of BONIVA. Physicians should be alert to signs or symptoms signaling a possible esophageal reaction during therapy, and patients should be instructed to discontinue BONIVA and seek medical attention if they develop symptoms of esophageal irritation such as new or worsening dysphagia, pain on swallowing, retrosternal pain, or heartburn. Nonclinical Toxicology Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility Carcinogenesis In a 104-week carcinogenicity study, doses of 3, 7, or 15 mg/kg/day were administered by oral gavage to male and female Wistar rats (systemic exposures up to 12 and 7 times, respectively, human exposure at the recommended daily oral dose of 2.5 mg, and cumulative exposures up to 3.5 and 2 times, respectively, human exposure at the recommended once-monthly oral dose of 150 mg, based on AUC comparison). There were no significant drug-related tumor findings in male or female rats. In a 78-week carcinogenicity study, doses of 5, 20, or 40 mg/kg/day were administered by oral gavage to male and female NMRI mice (exposures up to 475 and 70 times, respectively, human exposure at the recommended daily oral dose of 2.5 mg and cumulative exposures up to 135 and 20 times, respectively, human exposure at the recommended once-monthly oral dose of 150 mg, based on AUC comparison). There were no significant drug-related tumor findings in male or female mice. In a 90-week carcinogenicity study, doses of 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day were administered in the drinking water to NMRI mice (cumulative monthly exposures in males and females up to 70 and 115 times, respectively, human exposure at the recommended dose of 150 mg, based on AUC comparison). A dose-related increased incidence of adrenal subcapsular adenoma/carcinoma was observed in female mice, which was statistically significant at 80 mg/kg/day (220 to 400 times human exposure at the recommended daily oral dose of 2.5 mg and 115 times human exposure at the recommended once-monthly oral dose of 150 mg, based on AUC comparison). The relevance of these findings to humans is unknown. Mutagenesis There was no evidence for a mutagenic or clastogenic potential of ibandronate in the following assays: in vitro bacterial mutagenesis assay in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli (Ames test), mammalian cell mutagenesis assay in Chinese hamster V79 cells, and chromosomal aberration test in human peripheral lymphocytes, each with and without metabolic activation. Ibandronate was not genotoxic in the in vivo mouse micronucleus tests for chromosomal damage. Impairment of Fertility In female rats treated from 14 days prior to mating through gestation, decreases in fertility, corpora lutea, and implantation sites were observed at an oral dose of 16 mg/kg/day (45 times human exposure at the recommended daily oral dose of 2.5 mg and 13 times human exposure at the recommended once-monthly oral dose of 150 mg, based on AUC comparison). Use In Specific Populations Pregnancy Category C There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. BONIVA should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the mother and fetus. Bisphosphonates are incorporated into the bone matrix, from where they are gradually released over periods of weeks to years. The extent of bisphosphonate incorporation into adult bone, and hence, the amount available for release back into the systemic circulation, is directly related to the total dose and duration of bisphosphonate use. Although there are no data on fetal risk in humans, bisphosphonates do cause fetal harm in animals, and animal data suggest that uptake of bisphosphonates into fetal bone is greater than into maternal bone. Therefore, there is a theoretical risk of fetal harm (e.g., skeletal and other abnormalities) if a woman becomes pregnant after completing a course of bisphosphonate therapy. The impact of variables such as time between cessation of bisphosphonate therapy to conception, the particular bisphosphonate used, and the route of administration (intravenous versus oral) on this risk has not been established. In female rats given ibandronate orally at doses greater than or equal to 3 times human exposure at the recommended daily oral dose of 2.5 mg or greater than or equal to 1 times human exposure at the recommended once-monthly oral dose of 150 mg beginning 14 days before mating and continuing through lactation, maternal deaths were observed at the time of delivery in all dose groups. Perinatal pup loss in dams given 45 times human exposure at the recommended daily dose and 13 times the recommended once-monthly dose was likely related to maternal dystocia. Calcium supplementation did not completely prevent dystocia and periparturient mortality in any of the treated groups at greater than or equal to 16 times the recommended daily dose and greater than or equal to 4.6 times the recommended once-monthly dose. A low incidence of postimplantation loss was observed in rats treated from 14 days before mating throughout lactation or during gestation, only at doses causing maternal dystocia and periparturient mortality. In pregnant rats dosed orally from gestation day 17 through lactation day 21 (following closure of the hard palate through weaning), maternal toxicity, including dystocia and mortality, fetal perinatal and postnatal mortality, were observed at doses equivalent to human exposure at the recommended daily and greater than or equal to 4 times the recommended once-monthly dose. Periparturient mortality has also been observed with other bisphosphonates and appears to be a class effect related to inhibition of skeletal calcium mobilization resulting in hypocalcemia and dystocia (see Nonclinical Toxicology). Exposure of pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis resulted in an increased fetal incidence of RPU (renal pelvis ureter) syndrome at oral doses 30 times the human exposure at the recommended daily oral dose of 2.5 mg and greater than or equal to 9 times the recommended once-monthly oral dose of 150 mg. Impaired pup neuromuscular development (cliff avoidance test) was observed at 45 times human exposure at the daily dose and 13 times the once-monthly dose (see Nonclinical Toxicology). In pregnant rabbits treated orally with ibandronate during gestation at doses greater than or equal to 8 times the recommended human daily oral dose of 2.5 mg and greater than or equal to 4 times the recommended human once-monthly oral dose of 150 mg, dose-related maternal mortality was observed in all treatment groups. The deaths occurred prior to parturition and were associated with lung edema and hemorrhage. No significant fetal anomalies were observed (see Nonclinical Toxicology). Nursing Mothers It is not known whether BONIVA is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when BONIVA is administered to a nursing woman. In lactating rats treated with intravenous doses, ibandronate was present in breast milk from 2 to 24 hours after dose administration. Concentrations in milk averaged 1.5 times plasma concentrations. Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established. Geriatric Use Of the patients receiving BONIVA 2.5 mg daily in postmenopausal osteoporosis studies, 52% were over 65 years of age, and 10% were over 75 years of age. Of the patients receiving BONIVA 150 mg once-monthly in the postmenopausal osteoporosis 1-year study, 52% were over 65 years of age, and 9% were over 75 years of age. No overall differences in effectiveness or safety were observed between these patients and younger patients but greater sensitivity in some older individuals cannot be ruled out. Renal Impairment BONIVA is not recommended for use in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance less than 30 mL/min). Last reviewed on RxList: 1/5/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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