Disease: Pancreatitis

    Pancreatitis facts

    • About 80,000 cases of pancreatitis occur in the US every year.
    • Pancreatitis causes abdominal pain.
    • Pancreatitis can be an acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) condition.
    • The hallmark symptom of acute pancreatitis is abdominal pain. Other signs and symptoms of acute pancreatitis are:
      • nausea and vomiting
      • abdominal pain that may radiate to the back
      • pain that worsens after eating
      • chills and fever
      • tenderness of the abdomen to touch
      • lethargy and weakness
    • Diagnosis of pancreatitis is generally with blood and imaging tests.
    • Most cases of acute pancreatitis require hospitalization; however, treatment of chronic pancreatitis may be managed in an outpatient setting.
    • Complications of pancreatitis may include:
      • diabetes
      • pancreatic cancer
      • malnutrition
      • infection
      • pseudocyst formation
    • Pancreatitis can range from a mild, self-limited disease to a condition with life- threatening complications.

    What is pancreatitis?

    Pancreatitis is a condition characterized by inflammation of the pancreas.

    • The pancreas is an abdominal gland situated behind the stomach in the upper abdomen.
    • The main function of the pancreas is to secrete hormones and enzymes that help with digestion and regulate blood sugar (glucose) metabolism.
    • The digestive enzymes are released via the pancreatic duct into the small intestine where they are activated to help break down fats and proteins.
    • The digestive hormones (insulin and glucagon) produced by the pancreas are released into the blood stream where they help regulate blood sugar levels.

    Pancreatitis is categorized as being either acute or chronic.

    • Acute pancreatitis generally develops suddenly, and it is usually a short-term (a few days to weeks) illness that typically resolves with appropriate medical management.
    • Chronic pancreatitis, which typically develops after multiple episodes of acute pancreatitis, is a long-term condition that can last for months or even several years.

    Pancreatitis is a condition that may be mild and self-limiting, though it can also lead to severe complications that can be life-threatening. The acute form of pancreatitis, in its most severe form, can have deleterious effects on many other body organs, including the lungs and kidneys.

    Illustration of the Pancreas

    What are the causes of pancreatitis?

    Normally, digestive enzymes released by the pancreas are not activated to break down fats and proteins until they reach the small intestine. However, when these digestive enzymes are activated while still in the pancreas, inflammation and local damage to the pancreas occurs leading to pancreatitis.

    The causes of pancreatitis include:

    • Alcohol consumption
    • Gallstones
    • High triglyceride levels
    • Abdominal injury or surgery
    • Certain medications
    • Exposure to certain chemicals
    • Smoking
    • Family history of pancreatitis
    • Cystic fibrosis
    • Pancreatic cancer

    Alcohol consumption and gallstones account for over 80% of all cases of pancreatitis in the US.

    What are the signs and symptoms of pancreatitis?

    Pancreatitis causes upper abdominal pain which can range from mild to severe.

    The pain may come on suddenly or it may develop gradually. Often, the pain will start or worsen after eating, which can also occur with gallbladder or ulcer pain. Abdominal pain tends to be the hallmark of acute pancreatitis. People with acute pancreatitis usually feel very ill.

    Signs and symptoms of acute pancreatitis may include:

    • Abdominal pain that may radiate to the back
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Worsening pain after eating
    • Tenderness to touch of the abdomen
    • Fever and chills
    • Weakness and lethargy

    In chronic pancreatitis, abdominal pain also can be present, but it is often not as severe, and some people may not have any pain at all.

    Signs and symptoms of chronic pancreatitis may include:

    • Abdominal pain
    • Unintentional weight loss
    • Foul smelling, oily stool

    How is pancreatitis diagnosed?

    There are a number of tests that alone, or in combination, will help establish the diagnosis of pancreatitis.

    Blood tests

    Amylase and/or lipase levels are typically elevated in cases of acute pancreatitis. These blood tests may not be elevated in cases of chronic pancreatitis. These are usually the first tests performed to establish the diagnosis of pancreatitis, as these results are generally readily and quickly available. Other blood tests may be ordered, for example:

    • liver and kidney function tests
    • tests for infection, and
    • tests for anemia.
    Imaging studies

    A CT (computed tomography) scan of the abdomen may be ordered to visualize the pancreas and to evaluate the extent of inflammation, as well as any of the potential complications that can arise from pancreatitis, such as bleeding or pseudocyst (a collection of fluid) formation. The CT scan may also detect gallstones (a major cause of pancreatitis) and other abnormalities of the biliary system.

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to look for gallstones and abnormalities of the biliary system. Because ultrasound imaging does not emit radiation, this modality is frequently the initial imaging test obtained in cases of pancreatitis.

    Depending on the underlying cause of pancreatitis and the severity of illness, additional testing may be ordered.

    What is the treatment for pancreatitis?

    In most cases of acute pancreatitis, admission to the hospital is needed, whereas some cases of chronic pancreatitis can be managed in an outpatient setting.

    Depending on the underlying cause of pancreatitis, management may vary to address the specific cause. In general, however, the following treatment regimen will always be initiated for the treatment of pancreatitis.

    First-line treatment will involve:

    • Fasting to help the pancreas to rest and recover.
    • IV fluids to prevent dehydration while fasting
    • Pancreatitis can be very painful, thus intravenous pain medication is often necessary.

    If pancreatitis is due to an obstructing gallstone, surgical intervention may be required to remove the gallstone and/or remove the gallbladder. Intervention may also be required to treat a pseudocyst or to remove part of the affected pancreas.

    If alcohol consumption is the cause of pancreatitis, abstinence from alcohol and an alcohol rehabilitation program will be recommended.

    If a medication or chemical exposure is found to be the cause of pancreatitis, then removal of the medication or offending exposure is recommended.

    If high triglycerides are the cause of pancreatitis, then your health-care professional may prescribe medication to decrease the patient's triglyceride levels.

    Medications for pancreatitis

    In general, the above treatment regimen is the mainstay of pancreatitis management.

    Pain medication and medication to control nausea may also be prescribed.

    In cases of chronic pancreatitis, your health-care professional also may prescribe pancreatic enzyme supplements in order to help the body digest certain nutrients.

    Is there a special diet for pancreatitis?

    For people with pancreatitis, low-fat meals that are high in nutrients is the recommended diet. Adequate fluid intake is also recommended to prevent dehydration.

    What are some of the complications of pancreatitis?

    Pancreatitis can be a life-threatening illness with severe complications. Complications may include:

    • Diabetes: Damage to the pancreas can lead to diabetes due to the disruption in the secretion of insulin.
    • Pseudocyst formation: During acute pancreatitis, fluid and debris can collect in and around the pancreas. If rupture of this fluid-containing sac occurs, severe pain, infection and internal bleeding can result.
    • Malnutrition: Damage to the pancreas can lead to a decrease or absence of digestive enzymes produced, which can affect the absorption of various nutrients. This may lead to malnutrition and unintentional weight loss.
    • Pancreatic cancer: Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer.
    • Infection: Individuals with pancreatitis are at risk for the development of infection, which can lead to multi-organ failure, sepsis and ultimately death.

    What are the causes of pancreatitis?

    Normally, digestive enzymes released by the pancreas are not activated to break down fats and proteins until they reach the small intestine. However, when these digestive enzymes are activated while still in the pancreas, inflammation and local damage to the pancreas occurs leading to pancreatitis.

    The causes of pancreatitis include:

    • Alcohol consumption
    • Gallstones
    • High triglyceride levels
    • Abdominal injury or surgery
    • Certain medications
    • Exposure to certain chemicals
    • Smoking
    • Family history of pancreatitis
    • Cystic fibrosis
    • Pancreatic cancer

    Alcohol consumption and gallstones account for over 80% of all cases of pancreatitis in the US.

    What are the signs and symptoms of pancreatitis?

    Pancreatitis causes upper abdominal pain which can range from mild to severe.

    The pain may come on suddenly or it may develop gradually. Often, the pain will start or worsen after eating, which can also occur with gallbladder or ulcer pain. Abdominal pain tends to be the hallmark of acute pancreatitis. People with acute pancreatitis usually feel very ill.

    Signs and symptoms of acute pancreatitis may include:

    • Abdominal pain that may radiate to the back
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Worsening pain after eating
    • Tenderness to touch of the abdomen
    • Fever and chills
    • Weakness and lethargy

    In chronic pancreatitis, abdominal pain also can be present, but it is often not as severe, and some people may not have any pain at all.

    Signs and symptoms of chronic pancreatitis may include:

    • Abdominal pain
    • Unintentional weight loss
    • Foul smelling, oily stool

    How is pancreatitis diagnosed?

    There are a number of tests that alone, or in combination, will help establish the diagnosis of pancreatitis.

    Blood tests

    Amylase and/or lipase levels are typically elevated in cases of acute pancreatitis. These blood tests may not be elevated in cases of chronic pancreatitis. These are usually the first tests performed to establish the diagnosis of pancreatitis, as these results are generally readily and quickly available. Other blood tests may be ordered, for example:

    • liver and kidney function tests
    • tests for infection, and
    • tests for anemia.
    Imaging studies

    A CT (computed tomography) scan of the abdomen may be ordered to visualize the pancreas and to evaluate the extent of inflammation, as well as any of the potential complications that can arise from pancreatitis, such as bleeding or pseudocyst (a collection of fluid) formation. The CT scan may also detect gallstones (a major cause of pancreatitis) and other abnormalities of the biliary system.

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to look for gallstones and abnormalities of the biliary system. Because ultrasound imaging does not emit radiation, this modality is frequently the initial imaging test obtained in cases of pancreatitis.

    Depending on the underlying cause of pancreatitis and the severity of illness, additional testing may be ordered.

    What is the treatment for pancreatitis?

    In most cases of acute pancreatitis, admission to the hospital is needed, whereas some cases of chronic pancreatitis can be managed in an outpatient setting.

    Depending on the underlying cause of pancreatitis, management may vary to address the specific cause. In general, however, the following treatment regimen will always be initiated for the treatment of pancreatitis.

    First-line treatment will involve:

    • Fasting to help the pancreas to rest and recover.
    • IV fluids to prevent dehydration while fasting
    • Pancreatitis can be very painful, thus intravenous pain medication is often necessary.

    If pancreatitis is due to an obstructing gallstone, surgical intervention may be required to remove the gallstone and/or remove the gallbladder. Intervention may also be required to treat a pseudocyst or to remove part of the affected pancreas.

    If alcohol consumption is the cause of pancreatitis, abstinence from alcohol and an alcohol rehabilitation program will be recommended.

    If a medication or chemical exposure is found to be the cause of pancreatitis, then removal of the medication or offending exposure is recommended.

    If high triglycerides are the cause of pancreatitis, then your health-care professional may prescribe medication to decrease the patient's triglyceride levels.

    Medications for pancreatitis

    In general, the above treatment regimen is the mainstay of pancreatitis management.

    Pain medication and medication to control nausea may also be prescribed.

    In cases of chronic pancreatitis, your health-care professional also may prescribe pancreatic enzyme supplements in order to help the body digest certain nutrients.

    Is there a special diet for pancreatitis?

    For people with pancreatitis, low-fat meals that are high in nutrients is the recommended diet. Adequate fluid intake is also recommended to prevent dehydration.

    What are some of the complications of pancreatitis?

    Pancreatitis can be a life-threatening illness with severe complications. Complications may include:

    • Diabetes: Damage to the pancreas can lead to diabetes due to the disruption in the secretion of insulin.
    • Pseudocyst formation: During acute pancreatitis, fluid and debris can collect in and around the pancreas. If rupture of this fluid-containing sac occurs, severe pain, infection and internal bleeding can result.
    • Malnutrition: Damage to the pancreas can lead to a decrease or absence of digestive enzymes produced, which can affect the absorption of various nutrients. This may lead to malnutrition and unintentional weight loss.
    • Pancreatic cancer: Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer.
    • Infection: Individuals with pancreatitis are at risk for the development of infection, which can lead to multi-organ failure, sepsis and ultimately death.

    Source: http://www.rxlist.com

    In most cases of acute pancreatitis, admission to the hospital is needed, whereas some cases of chronic pancreatitis can be managed in an outpatient setting.

    Depending on the underlying cause of pancreatitis, management may vary to address the specific cause. In general, however, the following treatment regimen will always be initiated for the treatment of pancreatitis.

    First-line treatment will involve:

    • Fasting to help the pancreas to rest and recover.
    • IV fluids to prevent dehydration while fasting
    • Pancreatitis can be very painful, thus intravenous pain medication is often necessary.

    If pancreatitis is due to an obstructing gallstone, surgical intervention may be required to remove the gallstone and/or remove the gallbladder. Intervention may also be required to treat a pseudocyst or to remove part of the affected pancreas.

    If alcohol consumption is the cause of pancreatitis, abstinence from alcohol and an alcohol rehabilitation program will be recommended.

    If a medication or chemical exposure is found to be the cause of pancreatitis, then removal of the medication or offending exposure is recommended.

    If high triglycerides are the cause of pancreatitis, then your health-care professional may prescribe medication to decrease the patient's triglyceride levels.

    Source: http://www.rxlist.com

    Health Services in

    Define Common Diseases

    Senior Healthcare Matters helps you find information, definitaions and treatement options for most common diseases, sicknesses, illnesses and medical conditions. Find what diseases you have quick and now.